An Overview of The Moons of Mars


moons of mars

The moons of Mars are two natural satellites that orbit around the planet. There are only two known moons in the solar system which have orbits around another planet. They were discovered by Asaph Hall on August 18, 1877, and they share an orbital radius of about 6000 km (3700 miles) with an orbital period of 7.3 hours. The moons are named Phobos and Deimos, which are the Greek words for “fear” and “panic”, respectively. The twin moons were likely created by a giant impact on the Martian surface.

Phobos and Deimos

A large body of water

Both moons are heavily cratered and seem to be made of the same type of rock. Phobos is the larger of the two moons, with a diameter of 22 km (14 miles). It is an irregularly shaped object that is heavily cratered. Phobos is also unique in that it is slowly being pulled apart by Mars’ gravity and will eventually be destroyed. Phobos orbits very close to the planet, circling it every 7 hours and 39 minutes. It is heavily cratered, indicating that it is a very old object. Scientists believe that it may have been formed when a large asteroid struck Mars. Phobos is only about 27 kilometers (17 miles) in diameter, making it one of the smallest moons in the solar system.

Deimos is only 12 km (7.5 miles) in diameter. Deimos is the outer moon of Mars, orbiting at a distance of 23,460 km (14,580 miles). It has a much longer orbital period than Phobos, taking 30.3 hours to complete one orbit. Deimos is also very small, only 12 kilometers (7.5 miles) in diameter. It is thought to be a captured asteroid, as it has a very irregular shape.

The two moons have very different surface features. Phobos is covered in craters, while Deimos has a smooth surface. Phobos also has a large impact basin, called Stickney crater, which is about 9 km (5.6 miles) in diameter.

The two moons orbit Mars at different distances. Phobos orbits closer to Mars than Deimos, and it is slowly getting pulled apart by the planet’s gravity. Deimos is further away from Mars and is not affected by the planet’s gravity.

Why Does Mars Have Two Moons?

A large jetliner sitting on top of a grass covered field

The most likely explanation for why Mars has two moons is that they are captured asteroids. It is thought that the Martian moons may have formed in a similar way to the moons of Jupiter and Saturn, which are also thought to be captured asteroids.

The moons of Mars are small and irregular in shape, which is what we would expect for captured asteroids. Additionally, the orbital radius of the moons is similar to that of the asteroids in the asteroid belt.

The capture theory is supported by the fact that Mars does not have a large satellite like Earth’s moon. If Mars had formed with a large satellite, it is likely that the gravity of Mars would have pulled the satellite into a tighter orbit.

What’s Special About The Moons of Mars?

The moons of Mars are unique in a few ways. First, they are the only moons in the solar system that orbit around another planet. Second, they are very small, which is unusual for moons. Third, they have very irregular shapes. fourth, they share an orbital radius with each other.

Why Study The Moons of Mars?

The moons of Mars are interesting to study because they can tell us a lot about the formation and evolution of the solar system. They can give us insights into the formation of other moons in the solar system, as well as provide information about the early history of Mars. Additionally, they can provide insight into the potential for life on Mars. This is important because if we can find evidence of life on Mars, it would be a major step forward in our search for extraterrestrial life.

The moons of Mars are also interesting to study because they may one day be human habitats. Phobos, in particular, is a potential target for future colonization due to its proximity to Mars.

The moons of Mars are unique in a few ways. They orbit around another planet, they are very small, and they have irregular shapes. Additionally, they share an orbital radius with each other. These features make the moons of Mars interesting to study because they can tell us a lot about the formation and evolution of the solar system.

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